from Arena Magazine, No. 29, June-July 1997, pp. 39-41.

Shrinking the Dole Queue footnotes

Richard Gosden

Footnotes:

[1] Although this view was developed under the Labor government it seems unlikely to change under the new Liberal government.

[2] Department of Employment, Education, and Training, Working Nation, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, May 1994.

[3] Department of Employment, Education and Training, Annual Report 1994-95, Australian Government Printing Service, Canberra, 1995, pp. 203-206.

[4] Ibid., p. 16.

[5] Ibid., p. 16.

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[6] See for example, William H. Sledge, Boris Astrachan, Ken Thompson, Jaak Rakfeldt and Philip Leaf, `Case Management in Psychiatry: An Analysis of Tasks', American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 152, Number 9, September, 1995, pp. 1259-1265.

[7] Ibid., p. 211.

[8] Ibid., p. 177.

[9] Department of Employment, Education and Training, Special Intervention Program (SIP) Tender Specification -- Psychological Assessment & Intervention Services, DEET ACT/Illawarra Office, Programs Business Unit , 10 November 1995, p. 1.

[10] Attachment F, Special Intervention Assessment Report, ibid., p. 3.

[11] `General Information About Special Intervention-Employment Related Personal Development Needs (SIP ERPD), ibid., p. 3.

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[12] Ibid., p. 2.

[13] Ibid., p. 1.

[14] Frank Wilkinson, Senior Psychologist, Department of Employment, Education and Training, Personal telephone communication, November 28, 1995.

[15] Ibid., December 6, 1995.

[16] Ian Wilson, Programme Manager, Psychological Assessment Programme, ACT/Illawarra Area, Department of Employment, Education and Training, Personal telephone communication, December 15, 1995.

[17] Committee on Employment Opportunities, Restoring Full Employment, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1993.

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[18] Department of Employment, Education, and Training, Working Nation, op. cit.

[19] Department of Employment, Education and Training, Programs 1995-96, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1995.

[20] Department of Employment, Education and Training, Annual Report 1994-95, op. cit.

[21] Ian Wilson, op. cit.

[22] See for example, Thomas Szasz, The Myth of Mental Illness, Hoeber-Harper, New York, 1961. and Schizophrenia: The Sacred Symbol of Psychiatry, Basic Books, New York, 1976.

[23] Thomas Szasz, Cruel Compassion: Psychiatric Control of Society's Unwanted, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1994, p. 145.

[24] American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, American Psychiatric Association, Washington DC, 1994, p. 7.

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[25] Ibid., p. 285.

[26] Ibid., pp. 277-278.

[27] The history of ideas is replete with stories of inspiration from inner voices and personal deities. Socrates relied on an inner voice to guide him and the Christian religion was founded on advice and commands emanating from the deity which were received by various individuals. Generally speaking, the modern medical view of a person's relationship with a deity is that it is quite all right for a person to talk to their God in prayer so long as it is confined to a one-way communication of wishful thinking. But if belief is raised to the level where the God is perceived to respond it becomes a symptom of mental disease.

[28] Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Report of the National Inquiry into the Human Rights of People with Mental Illness, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1993, p. 846.

[29] Simon Crean, Minister for Employment, Education and Training, ABC Radio News, 1PM, December 8, 1995.

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